L-M BRIC News                                      03-31-2004 © 
L-M Braiding Research & Information Center / Masako Kinoshita
5 Winthrop Place, Ithaca, NY 14850 U. S. A.
Phone & Fax 607-257-0886 e-mail mkinoshi@twcny.rr.com
L-M BRIC News No. 7
 

Notes

(1) Orit Shamir, Curator of Organic Materials, Israel Aniqueties Authority.

Alisa Baginski, College of Textile Technology and Fashion.

(2) Carolyn Priest-Dorman, researcher of pre-industrial-revolution textile techniques. She also organizes and coordinates meetings, workshops of these technkiiques.

(3) Beno Rothenberg, Professor, University College, London; Director, the Institute of Archaeo-metallurgical Studies, the Institute of Archaeology, University College, London.

Rothenberg, Beno, with contributions by H. G. Bachmann ... [et. al.], The Egyptian mining temple at Timna, London: IAMS [and] Institute of Archaeology, University College, London, 1988.

(4) Gudjonsson, E. E., 'Icelandic Loop-Braided Bands: Krilud Bond,' Bulletin de Liaison du CIETA 49, 1975 65-68, fig 3a.

(5) N. Speiser, The manual of braiding, Basel: private publication, 1983, second edition 1986.

(6) UO #1 and UO #2 both have the obverse face obviously different from the reverse face that make them the hallmark of the l-m braid. See The manual of braiding (2nd edition) p. 85. UO #1 is the one made when the loop is transferred 'open' and UO #2 that made when the loop is transferred 'crossed.' For instance, see News No. 2, L-M braiding of Cuna Indians, Fig. 1.

(7) Mari Omura, Lead researcher at Ethnographic Materials Research Section. Gangoji Institute for Cultural Property, Nara, Japan.

(8) See ILLUSTRATED INSTRUCTION SERIES NO, 7.

(9) According to the past research of a few medieval single-face kikko braids, two were deemed to have been made using method #1. The other two fit to none of the three possibilities, yet have little possibility of having been made using the stand-and-bobbin technique. There are few authentic medieval kikko specimens hampering further study.

(10) Method #2 of finger-held l-m is different from method #2 of kute-uchi procedures for constructing single-face Kikko braids. See, for instance, L-M BRIC News No. 2, 1999, p. 3.

(11) Reconstructed technique: Kinoshita, M., 'A braiding technique documented in an early nineteenth-century treatise "Soshun Biko",' The Textile Museum Journal 1986, 25, 1987.

(12) Kinnoshita, M., Study of Archaic Braiding Techniques in Japan, Kyoto, Kyoto Shoin, 1994.

(13) There are 2-layer double-face kikkos constructed using takadai. The patterning principle used is double face pick-up technique, entirely different from 4-layer double-face kikkos.

(14) Mumford, C. L., BSc Hons. (Archaeological Conservation), Cardiff University, 1976. Conservator in Dept. of Archaeology & Numismatics, National Museum of Wales, since 1980.

(15) Plenderleith, Elizabeth. 1956. "The Technique" in "The Stole and Maniples," pp. 375-395 in _The Relics of St. Cuthbert, ed. C.F. Battiscombe. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

(16) Crowfoot, Elisabeth, Pritchard, Frances, and Staniland, Kay. Textiles and Clothing c. 1150-1450: Medieval Finds from Excavations in London 4. London: Her Majesty's Stationery Office, 1992.

(17) Granger-Taylor, H., Pritchard, F., 'A fine quality "Insular" embroidery from the Late Ninth/Early Tenth Century Crannog at Llangorse, Near Brecon', Redknap, M. et al. Eds., Pattern and Purpose in Insular Art, Oxford, 2001.